Peanut Butter Chocolate Banana Ice Cream (#33-E)

25 10 2012

Recently, a 52 Scoops reader requested some ideas for kid-friendly ice cream recipes.  For a moment, I thought: All ice cream is kid friendly!  But then, after scanning my Recipes page, I realized that unusual ice cream flavours like Mint and Peas, Maple Chocolate Bacon, and Black Sesame probably wouldn’t rank very highly in many kids’ books.

Kids like simple, basic flavours, so I figured peanut butter + banana + chocolate would be a pretty safe bet (except for those with nut allergies — sorry!!!).

This recipe involves churning chocolate covered banana pieces into an egg-free peanut butter ice cream.  (Since peanut butter is already quite rich, I thought I could easily eliminate eggs from the recipe without compromising the creaminess of the ice cream.)

chocolate covered banana

Chocolate covered banana pieces, ready to be churned into peanut butter ice cream.

For the best tasting ice cream, choose an all-natural peanut butter for this recipe, one that doesn’t contain any extra ingredients such as hydrogenated oils.  Smooth or crunchy?  That is a topic of great debate, and I will leave that up to you.  If you have a peanut allergy, substituting another nut butter for this recipe would work just fine.

Results?  A delectable treat that can be enjoyed by little kids and big kids alike.  The ice cream looked and smelled so enticing that the Official Taster, who was banned from tasting this week due to a mild peanut allergy, decided to taste anyway!

Peanut Butter Chocolate Banana Ice Cream  (Makes about 1 L)

For the Peanut Butter Ice Cream:

1/2 cup all-natural peanut butter (or substitute your favourite nut butter)
3/4 cup white sugar
3 cups half-and-half cream
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the Chocolate Covered Bananas:

1 cup of diced, ripe banana (about one large banana)
70 g of premium dark chocolate Read the rest of this entry »





Pineapple Coconut Ice Cream Fail!!

17 07 2012

I was really hoping this would be recipe #18-D/E — the dairy-free and egg-free version of Caramelized Pineapple Ice Cream #18.  But after two rounds in the test kitchen, I’m tossing in the apron.  This is recipe #18-FF for FAIL.  It went something like this:

Attempt #1: The first round started with caramelizing chopped pineapple as per instructions in the original recipe, then churning it into Week 17’s Toasted Coconut Ice Cream, minus the toasted coconut.  But for whatever reason, the two wouldn’t marry; the buttery caramelized pineapple chunks together with the coconut ice cream was far too rich a combination.

Attempt#2: I prepared another batch of caramelized pineapple.  This time, I pureed it, since the chunkiness of the fruit seemed to be an issue the first time around.  To lighten up the mouthfeel, I thought I would eliminate the eggs from the recipe and go Philly-style.  So, I had caramelized pineapple puree + coconut milk + rum + sugar.  Blend it, chill it, churn it, DONE.  Easy peasy right?  Well it was easy, but the texture and taste of the ice cream still wasn’t right.  The Official Taster even said to me: “This does NOT work.”

Pineapple and coconut should be an exquisite combination, but I am currently 0 for 2.  Readers, do you have any tips for making dairy-free and egg-free caramelized pineapple and coconut ice cream?  Should I thin down the base with some coconut water?  Use more fruit?  Use more sugar?  Other?

I welcome any of your suggestions — you can post a comment or tip below.  I’d love to hear from you!





Caramelized Pineapple Ice Cream (#18)

11 07 2012
Dairy Queen pineapple sundae

My weakness!

I have a confession.  Even though I’ve committed to a year of ice cream making (over one-third of the way through!!!), I still, on occasion, like going to Dairy Queen.  Pineapple sundaes are a bit of a weakness for me.  I don’t care what crazy, unpronouceable ingredients go into them.  I am a sucker for sweet soft serve ice cream and tangy pineapple.  But when I mentioned the other day that I wanted a DQ pineapple sundae, the Official Taster raised an eyebrow and gave me a look.  While Tavis did oblige and let me indulge, I knew it was time to develop a 52 Scoops pineapple treat.

I used to think that pineapples were really finicky to peel and cut.  When Tavis and I were visiting the floating markets in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam last year, we marvelled at the ability of the pineapple vendors.  The vendors, mostly women, have perfected the art of peeling and spiral cutting a pineapple in just a minute or two. They are MACHINES, carving perfect little hand-held snacks for boatloads of happy travellers passing through the delta.

Floating market pineapple vendor

Pineapples, pineapples everywhere!

Woman cutting pineapple

Pineapple Lady expertly peeling a pineapple

Spiral cutting a pineapple

Spiral cutting out the eyes of the pineapple

Fresh pineapple

Yum!

Here’s a link to a very helpful spiral cutting technique video on YouTube.  Once you practice a few times, you’ll get the hang of it and you’ll never need to buy canned or pre-cored/cut pineapple again!

For this ice cream recipe, I caramelized the pineapple in a little bit of butter and brown sugar.  Cooking the pineapple takes away the acidic bite on your tongue and results in a deeper, richer taste.  The addition of rum keeps the pineapple from freezing into solid chunks, while imparting another layer of flavour.  When the caramelized pineapple is churned into a simple vanilla base — absolutely exquisite!

Caramelized Pineapple Ice Cream (#18)  (Makes about 1.5 L)

Ice Cream:

2 eggs
3/4 cup white sugar
3 cups half-and-half cream
1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract

Caramelized Pineapple (makes about 2 cups):

3 cups of fresh pineapple tidbits (half to one pineapple, depending on size and your peeling abilities)
2 tbsp butter
3 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp rum (I used spiced rum)

Read the rest of this entry »





Toasted Coconut Ice Cream (#17-D)

4 07 2012

Since Week #3, my sister has been bugging me to make coconut ice cream.  I have learned that, on occasion, she indulges in Coconut Bliss, an organic, dairy-free ice cream that is made from coconut milk (obviously).  It also happens to cost about $9.00 a pint!  No wonder I’ve been nudged on many an occasion to crank out a batch of coconut ice cream for her!  Since it’s my sister’s birthday this week, I will oblige.  So, here we have it: Toasted Coconut Ice Cream, the first “Happy Coconut” recipe in the 52 Scoops repertoire.  Dairy-free and delicious!  And, it cost me less than $5.00 to make a whole litre.

Coconut milk can be a bit confusing.  When I was little, I thought the water inside the coconut was “coconut milk”.  This liquid is, in fact, coconut waterCoconut milk is made by grating the meat from a mature coconut and extracting the liquid from the meat (e.g. squeezing it through cheese cloth).  The first pressing yields a luscious, thick, flavourful milk with a high fat content.  The leftover coconut meat can then be soaked in warm water and squeezed a second or perhaps even a third time.  Subsequent pressings result in a thinner milk.  When coconut milk is left to settle, the fattier components separate and rise to the top.  This thick, buttery substance is coconut cream.

inside young coconut

The Official Taster scooping the soft, gelatinous meat from the inside a young coconut. This coconut would be too young for making coconut milk, but I thought it’d be a cool photo to include nonetheless!  (Mekong Delta, Vietnam, 2011)

I wasn’t ambitious enough to make my own coconut milk for this recipe, so I opted for the canned variety instead.  There is a huge range in the quality of canned coconut milk.  I usually use Aroy-D brand, which contains 60% coconut extract and 40% water.  Beware of cheaper brands that use less coconut extract, more water, and various additives and preservatives such as potassium metabisulphite E224.  Potass-a-what?  No thanks!

This recipe yields a very rich ice cream with a wonderful texture and chew from the toasted coconut.  The ice cream does freeze up harder and icier compared to other recipes containing dairy cream, so it is best enjoyed within a few hours of churning.  If you must store it longer, let it soften up in the fridge for at least 30 minutes prior to scooping.

A note to egg-freers: This recipe was also tested omitting the eggs, but, alas, I am sad to report that the results were unsatisfactory.  The ice cream was immensely hard and icy and seemed to lack depth in terms of flavour.  But don’t worry, there is lots of action in the test kitchen, and I assure you there will be egg-free Happy Coconut recipes in the near future!

Toasted Coconut Ice Cream  (Makes about 1 L)

2 eggs
3/4 cup white sugar
2 – 13.5 oz (400 ml) cans of coconut milk
1 cup of dessicated coconut

Read the rest of this entry »





Banana Bread Ice Cream (#15-D/E)

20 06 2012
bananas

Ripe Bananas 29 cents / lb

These bananas just about overstayed their welcome at the produce store.  With so much competition from other summery fruits (Berries!  Melons!  Mangoes!), they were neglected, never chosen.  Brown spots started appearing, and that’s when they were demoted to the back of the store — marked with a blue felt-tipped pen and tossed into a bin that said Ripe Bananas 29 cents / lb.  Brilliant.  Eight pounds, please.

Speckly brown bananas are soft and sweet, have a deep flavour, and have none of those annoying stringy fibres.  While probably past their prime for eating outright, they are perfect for making banana bread — and even better — banana bread ice cream.

This is the first 52 Scoops ice cream recipe that is egg-free.  The gooeyness of mashed, ripe banana makes for a delectably thick ice cream mix that is very similar in consistency to a cooked custard.  When churned, it yields a well-structured ice cream where the flavour of the fruit takes centre stage.

As noted in my post on egg-free ice cream making tips earlier this week, egg-free ice cream recipes tend to work best with fruit flavours.  With summer officially in full swing (Happy Solstice, everyone!) and fresh fruit abound at the markets, I promise there will be more egg-free ice cream recipes to come!

Banana Bread Ice Cream (Makes about 1.25 L)

Adapted from Serious Eats

2 tbsp butter
4 bananas (about 2 cups mashed)
1/2 cup brown sugar
3 cups half-and-half cream*
Pinch of sea salt
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 c chopped walnuts, toasted

Read the rest of this entry »





Mango Ice Cream with Chili Sea Salt (#8)

4 05 2012

Update – May 24, 2012: This recipe has been awarded a “Community Pick” on Food 52!

Last week, I posted a recipe for Matcha Ice Cream, and the week before that, Black Sesame Ice Cream.  It would only make sense that I complete the trilogy of common Japanese ice cream flavours with Mango Ice Cream.  I will throw in a Southeast Asian twist though: chili sea salt.

In Southeast Asia, it is quite common to eat tropical fruit such as mango, papaya, guava, pomelo, and pineapple dipped in chili salt as a snack.  This may sound rather bizarre, but it’s tasty, refreshing, and rather addictive.  When I was travelling in Vietnam last year, mango and chili salt quickly emerged as my favourite combination, and I would seek out a mango vendor every day.  Women would expertly peel and cut mangoes, tuck the slices into a plastic bag, and toss in a tiny bag of chili salt for my dipping pleasure.

Use Ataulfo mangoes for this recipe to yield the most lusciously smooth mango ice cream you’ll ever taste.  With a gentle sprinkling of chili sea salt — absolutely divine!!!

Silky and sweet ataulfo mangoes

Mango Ice Cream with Chili Sea Salt  (Makes about 1 L)

Ice Cream:

3 to 4 ripe Ataulfo mangoes (enough to yield 2 cups of puree)
Juice of one lime
2 eggs
1/2  cup white sugar
1/4 cup honey
3 cups half-and-half cream

Chili Sea Salt:

3 tablespoons sea salt
2 Thai red chilis

(Note: You will have leftovers.  Store in a small jar and use for dipping fruit or for cooking.)

Read the rest of this entry »








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